Skin tag removal

How to Remove Skin Tags

January 24, 2019

Skin tags are skin-colored bumps that look similar to warts. However, they aren’t warts. The main difference between the two would be the texture. While warts have an irregular surface, skin tags appear smooth. Warts are stuck to the skin whereas skin tags are dangling as if they have a “stalk”. But don’t worry, skin tags aren’t dangerous and can sometimes fade away on their own. While people consult their dermatologist for skin tag removal, here are ways how to remove skin tags easily and naturally.

Skin Tag Removal at Home

Tea Tree Oil

Tea Tree Oil is one of the most famous natural treatments for skin diseases. And Skin tags are no different. Because skin tags are created in the folds of the skin, dirt can accumulate there. Having Tea Tree Oil not only removes the bacteria in the skin but also any fungal build up. While nourishing your skin, it’ll help you dry out the skin tag. Get a cotton swab and rub it on the skin tag. Do this every night until the skin dries out and it’ll fall off.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar is acidic which melts the dirt off. But Apple Cider just doesn’t do that. It also has antibacterial properties that make a surface acidic to prevent them from proliferating. Apple Cider Vinegar also balances out your skin by removing the toxins that are present on your face. And it works not just on skin tags but also on age spots, blemishes, and pimples. To apply, get a cotton swab and brush that area with Apple Cider Vinegar nightly until it goes away.

Avocado and Nuts

What is the common thing in Avocados and Nuts? It’s that they’re all rich in Vitamin E. They’re being rich in Vitamin E makes them a big component to keeping one’s skin healthy. It also adds that glow and makes sure that your skin has a balanced complexion. It also prevents your skin from aging faster and in an unbalanced way which makes it more susceptible to skin tags.

Apricot Exfoliating Scrub

While any exfoliating scrub can do, we’d prefer the apricot one. Apricot exfoliating scrubs not only exfoliate the dead or damaged skin cells but they also refresh your skin. Apricot is known to have a lot of vitamins that are beneficial to the skin. The exfoliating can help remove the “stalks” that connect the skin tags to your face. It also helps the removal of cellulite by removing the dead skin and damaged collagen that accumulated over time. The friction helps dry it up allowing it to fall off.

Garlic

Garlic has a lot of uses. Not only does it have uses in food but it also has antibacterial properties and anti-inflammatory properties. What you need is not the entire garlic but the juices. Simply squeeze a garlic clove and rub it on your skin. The smell might be a bit bad but the inflammation should stop swelling. At the same time, it’ll help you not have your skin stretched out due to inflammation.

While these are natural home remedies for skin tags, you shouldn’t do this if the skin tags start to change. When you notice that there’s a change, inform your dermatologist immediately.

Sources:

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